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PROGRAMS
Educational Programs - Preschool - Summer Programs - Special Events - Workshops

Educational Programs
Quiet Valley Educational Programs

Quiet Valley offers a variety of programs for classrooms and special tours for school groups visiting the farm fall, winter and spring, from Labor Day until the 3rd Saturday in June when we open for Summer Tours. We also can come out to your Senior,Nursing Home, Homeschool, Red Hat, or Historical group. See below for more information about these learning opportunities. School Teachers please also check out Teacher Resources for additional information about our programs for school groups for fall, winter and spring and available dates.

JUMP TO
Farm Tours - Farm Hand Adventure - One Room School House
Sheep/One Room School House - Sheep School Visit - Chicken School Visit
  Hands on History - Homeschool Volunteer Experience - Outreach Programs - Kids & Critters

Farm Tours (Grades 1 and up):

Each tour lasts approximately 3 to 4 hours:

The farm is an example of life on a self-sufficient homestead . "Family" guides in period clothing share the daily routine of a typical Pennsylvania German family and its descendants who lived at this location from 1765 to 1913.

There are fourteen buildings, including original and reconstructed, on the farm. Our guides take you back in time to relive the story of a family and to observe the activities typical of nineteenth century farm life.

The barnyard animals are here to watch, listen and touch. Learn about the role animals played in the daily life of the farm. A hay jump in the barn provides added fun.

Academic Standards met by our Tour:
Pennsylvania History Standards
Pennsylvania Science and Technology Standards

RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED
Weekdays - April to 1st week in June & Fall
Grades 1 and up
$5.00 Children, 1 Teacher free for each 10 children, $8.00 Adults
Minimum: $100.00

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Farm Hand Adventure (Grades 3 and up):

This program lasts 3 1/2 to 4 hours:

Hands-on participation in small groups learning 19th century skills like bread making, butter churning, crafts and games. Program is held at the Engel Education Building at Quiet Valley.

RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED
Weekdays - November, January, February, March, early April
Grades 3 and up
$10.00 per person ($200 minimum)

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1893 One Room School House (Grades 3 and up):

This program lasts 3 1/2 to 4 hours:

Our School Marm begins the day with the opening exercises: greeting, Pledge of Allegiance, singing and a Bible reading. Next, slate assignments are given, followed by recitation and arithmetic. At mid-day there is lunch (not included) and recess, during which the children play old-time games. In the afternoon spelling bees, history, science, geography and penmanship completes the schedule.

Our reconstructed schoolhouse is furnished with slant-top desks hand crafted at Quiet Valley and a vintage pot-belly stove, dating from 1882, stands in the center of the room. In the vestibule there is a water jar, a place for lunch pails and coat hooks. Prior to coming, instructions will be mailed to stimulate the interest of your students and prepare them for their journey back in time. Children are encouraged to wear period clothing.

RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED
Weekdays - November, January, February, March, early April, and Summer
Grades 3 and up
$6.50 per person ($125 minimum)

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Molly/One Room School House (Grades K and up):

This program lasts 3 1/2 to 4 hours:

This program held on-site at Quiet Valley combines two of our most popular programs for children. Students learn about the importance of sheep and wool on the farm by meeting Molly the Sheep and taking part in hands-on activities related to spinning and weaving. Participants also take part in a One Room School experience in our reconstructed Schoolhouse.

RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED
Weekdays - November, January, February, March, early April
Grades 1 & up
$5.00 per person ($100 minimum)

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Molly the Sheep visits You or you can come to the Farm (Grades K and up):

This program lasts approximately 1 1/2 hour:

Hands-on demonstrations in your "Group" including wool carding, spinning and weaving. Our live sheep Molly will be there too! Great for senior citizens too!

RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED
Weekdays - November to early April
Grades K and up
$75 per group (if more than 25 in group - $2.40 additional per person)
($225.00 minimum) plus mileage if we come to you
@ current Federal reimbursement rate ($.565 as of 1/1/13)
Limited Travel Area

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Henrietta visits You or you can come to the Farm
(Kindergarten & 1st Grade):

This program lasts approximately 1 1/4 hour:

Original story of the farm and a farm chicken told in your classroom or our Education Building with our live chicken, Henrietta! Includes games and related activities.

RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED
Weekdays - November 1 to mid March
Kindergarten & 1st Grade
$60 per class (if more than 25 in group - $1.60 additional per person)
($180.00 minimum) plus mileage if we come to you
@ current Federal reimbursement rate ($.565 as of 1/1/13)
Limited Travel Area

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Hands on History for Groups


An Exciting, Interactive Way to Learn History - Throughout the fall, winter and early spring, Quiet Valley offers a number of Hands on History Programs for any group. These programs cover a variety of topics relating to life on an early Pennsylvania-German farm. They are interactive and allow all ages to learn more about our past.

Groups may make a reservation for the program and date that they desire. A group consists of a minimum of ten people and a maximum of 25 to reserve a day. The program will cost $10 for each participant with a family maximum of $50. The following programs are available:

  • A Day’s Life of an Early American Boy - This program is available year-round.
    Experience a boy’s life from the 1800’s, learning some of the skills that every young man used every day. Participants will use an ax and the two-man saw to cut logs, use a froe (and find out what a froe is), split wood with a maul, drill holes in wood, see how a beam is hewed, have an in-depth look at many antique tools, and complete the day by making their own level to take with them. This is an excellent program for Boy Scout troops, homeschool groups, or any other group of men and boys who want to learn some basic woodworking skills.
    • Program length – Four hours
    • Age: Boys age 12 and up and adults (Please note that the age limit will be strictly enforced. Boys younger than 12 will not be admitted to the program under any circumstances.)
    • Cost: $18.00 per person, $100.00 minimum
    • Maximum number of participants - 8
November through March Programs:
  • Christmas Throughout the ColoniesIn the days before the Revolutionary War, how was Christmas celebrated? Was it celebrated at all? What foods were served? What were the most common types of entertainment during the Christmas season. Participants will learn about the different Christmas customs throughout the original 13 colonies, make commonly made Christmas foods, do a couple of traditional Christmas crafts, and listen to Christmas music from the Moravian tradition. So come and make the Christmas trip from Maine to Georgia.
  • Hearts, Flowers and CandyA Valentine’s Day program - the participants will be doing a variety of activities to help them get ready for the day. Participants will make two different types of Valentines – one done with Iris Paper Folding and the second one by weaving. We will be learning about the language of flowers and how a bouquet of flowers can be more than pretty, it can also send a message. Finally, what would Valentine’s Day be without some candy. We will be make three traditional kinds of candy – potato, peanut brittle and toffee.
  • Onions, Peas, Beans and Spinach GrowThe survival of early Pennsylvania German families depended on the produce of their gardens for their survival. What did their gardens look like? What would they have grown? What did they do to keep their soil healthy? What is a seed and what do seeds from different plants look like? We will be looking at soil composition, nutrient replacement, composting, garden location and design and how the labor was traditionally divided between men and women. Finally, participants will be planting seeds that they can eventually plant out in their own garden at home.
  • NEW * EGGS, RABBITS AND TREES – A PENNSYLVANIA-GERMAN EASTER * NEW
    The Pennsylvania-Germans brought many Lent and Easter traditions with them to their new country, many of which we still celebrate today. Learn about dyeing eggs, the Easter Bunny, the Easter Egg Tree, and more. Come and learn about how our modern Easter traditions were born. Decorate eggs, fry up some fastnachts, make some Easter cards and more. Come and discover a Pennsylvania-German Easter with your group.
  • Spring is Popping Out All OverA look at the early signs of spring in the woods and garden. What are some things you should look for that tells you that spring has come, other than the robin's coming back? You might be surprised at how many there are. Participants will also spend time on traditional spring activities, like egg dyeing using onion skins, and egg scratching, a traditional method of egg decorating. We will also make hot cross buns, a traditional Good Friday treat and special spring candles, and, if the violets are out, we will be making and eating some candied violets.
  • Clothing in the 1800’sThe 19th century was a time of rapid change in all aspects of American life. The country moved from firelight to electricity, the horse drawn wagon to the automobile, and the log cabin to skyscrapers. Clothing mirrored these changes, with many different styles coming and going during that 100 years. From the Empire style to the late Victorian hourglass figure, participants will be able to see how the clothing changed. They will also learn different types of hand sewing stitches, a mandatory skill in the days before the sewing machines.
  • Food Preservation – From Salt to Canning Jars - Before the days of electric refrigerators and freezers, and a grocery store at every corner, being able to preserve enough food to last throughout the winter was a life and death proposition. Learn about the variety of food preservation methods available to the early Pennsylvania settler, including salting, drying, smoking, and storing food in root cellars and springhouses. The program will also look at the development of home canning, and how it revolutionized the diet and health of the American people. This program will last between one to one and a half hours. (Note: We would be able to pass out food samples as part of the demonstration if you would like.)
  • Lighting Through the Ages - How did people light their homes before there were electric lights? This program shows the many different types of lighting devices developed over the centuries to light homes after dark. From whale oil to tallow to kerosene, a variety of lighting instruments were invented to meet the people’s needs. We will bring a large variety of items for people to see and hold. Wicking and beeswax sheets can be provided for the residents to make their own small candles. This program will last between one to one and a half hours.
  • What "Wood" Would a Woodchuck Chuck? - There were trees everywhere when the first settlers came to Pennsylvania. The Depper family settled on our farm because of the Black Walnut trees. What did people use all of the trees for, and what do we use those same trees for today? Participants will learn about the most common trees in Pennsylvania, the tree structure and the different parts of the tree that are used for identification purposes, even when they don’t have any leaves on them. What is the difference between soft wood and hard wood? What happens inside the tree as it grows? What do different woods look like? We will cover all this and more. This program will last between one to one hour and fifteen minutes.
  • Just for Nice - Pennsylvania German Folk Art - Life was hard for the early settlers in Pennsylvania, but that does not mean that they did not create works of art. This program talks about scherenschnitte, fraktur, tinwork, decorative painting on furniture and decorative fabrics. We are able to leave two different folk art projects that your residents would be able to do at a later time if you desire. This program will last between one to one and a quarter hours.
  • Simple MachinesThe early Pennsylvania-German farmer had many different types of simple machines at his disposal, and even though they were simple, that doesn’t mean they didn’t make the farmer’s life much easier. Participants will learn about the screw, lever and inclined plane, and how these machines were used on the farm. This program has many hands-on activities, including trying out a catapult!

If you are interested in any of these programs, please contact the Farm and make a reservation for your group. Remember, you only need 10 people to reserve a day. All participants should bring their own lunch. So, talk to your groups, check your calendar and then call to sign up for a Hands on History program.

All Hands on History Programs are (except as noted above):

Time: 10:00am until 2:00pm, with a half hour lunch break.
Cost: $10.00 per person with a maximum cost of $50.00 per family
(per session)
Deadline for registration: two weeks prior to your program with a non-refundable deposit of $25.00
Minimum age - 6 years
All materials will be provided and you should bring your own lunch.
Class size: minimum of 10 with a maximum of 25

Contact Cheryl Statham at 992-6161 or E-mail programs@quietvalley.org to make a reservation..


Homeschool Volunteer Experience - Spring 2014

April, May, & June - Quiet Valley’s Homeschool Volunteer Experience is an educationally meaningful and enjoyable program for individual students ages 10 and up, and parents are welcome to participate with younger children. Students will have the opportunity to learn about Pennsylvania German history by experiencing it firsthand. They will become an integral part of our spring School Tour Program by working closely with our staff members in a variety of activities. The homeschool participants will bring the farm to life by coming one day per week (for either 5 weeks, or the full spring tour season) in authentic costume for a period of 4 to 6 hours.

Children will learn about period clothing, museum etiquette and artifact handling, then assist our guides on the actual tour, helping with animals, weaving on the loom, cooking on an open hearth, assisting in a one room school “lesson” or helping during the barn/smokehouse portion of the tour. Students may even be given the opportunity to conduct a portion of the tour under supervision.

A family membership is all that is required to participate in this volunteer experience. For more information and to enroll, please contact Cheryl Statham by E-mail or 570-992-6161.

The Spring Quiet Valley Homeschool Volunteer Experience will begin in early April and run through June 13. We would welcome your involvement in the program this spring. If you are interested, please complete the Application Form. To assure your participation in the program, all completed applications must be received by February. If you participated in the past, as space in the program is limited, we would appreciate knowing if you choose not to participate in the spring program this year.

An organizational meeting will be held on Monday, February 10 at 9:00 am with a snow date of Monday, February 24. Please bring all costumes you may have borrowed from Quiet Valley, even if you are planning on using them again. There will also be time to pick out any new costumes, and copy any patterns you may need. Please note that there is a $5 refundable deposit per family for costumes borrowed from Quiet Valley.

The training session for all participants, will be on Monday, March 24 from 9:00 to 2:00. Students will spend time learning specific skills for their area, as well as learn other historical facts that will be important to their understanding of this period of history. Participants should bring their lunch and wear their costume, so it can be checked for authenticity. We ask that all participants make every effort to attend at least one of these very important sessions.

The expanded spring tour experience for all participants is on Monday, March 31 from 9:30 to 2:30. After taking a special expanded tour and lunch, all participants will have an extended time in the areas they will be in, so they can work on their part of the tour with our staff members.

Finally, please mark your calendars for our Annual Picnic. It will be on Thursday, May 29 at 5:30 (rain date Thursday, June 5). More information will follow as the spring progresses.

Please remember that a family membership is required to participate in this volunteer experience.

Our homeschoolers are very valuable to the success of our spring school tours. We look forward to seeing and working with you.

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Outreach Programs
Available year round! Informative and entertaining, for Senior Groups, Nursing Homes, Homeschoolers, Red Hats, Historical Groups, etc.
QUILTING THROUGHOUT THE AGES
How long have people been quilting? Where did quilting begin? How have quilts changed over the years? These and many other interesting items about quilts and the people who made them will be revealed in this new Outreach Program. Call today to schedule a visit to your group by one of our staff.

LIGHTING THROUGHOUT THE AGES – How did people light their homes before there were electric lights? This program shows the many different types of lighting devices developed over the centuries to light homes after dark. From whale oil to tallow to kerosene, a variety of lighting instruments were invented to meet the people’s needs. We will bring a large variety of items for people to see and hold. Wicking and beeswax sheets can be provided for the residents to make their own small candles. This program will last between one to one and a half hours.

FOOD PRESERVATION – FROM SALT TO CANNING JARS – Before the days of electric refrigerators and freezers, and a grocery store at every corner, being able to preserve enough food to last throughout the winter was a life and death proposition. Learn about the variety of food preservation methods available to the early Pennsylvania settler, including salting, drying, smoking, and storing food in root cellars and springhouses. The program will also look at the development of home canning, and how it revolutionized the diet and health of the American people. This program will last between one to one and a half hours. (Note: We would be able to pass out food samples as part of the demonstration if you would like.)

JUST FOR NICE – PENNSYLVANIA-GERMAN FOLK ART – Life was hard for the early settlers in Pennsylvania, but that does not mean that they did not create works of art. This program talks about scherenschnitte, fraktur, tinwork, decorative painting on furniture and decorative fabrics. We are able to leave two different folk art projects that your residents would be able to do at a later time if you desire. This program will last between one to one and a quarter hours.

WHAT “WOOD” WOULD A WOODCHUCK CHUCK? – There were trees everywhere when the first settlers came to Pennsylvania. The Depper family settled on our farm because of the Black Walnut trees. What did people use all of the trees for, and what do we use those same trees for today? Participants will learn about the most common trees in Pennsylvania, the tree structure and the different parts of the tree that are used for identification purposes, even when they don’t have any leaves on them. What is the difference between soft wood and hard wood? What happens inside the tree as it grows? What do different woods look like? We will cover all this and more. This program will last between one to one hour and fifteen minutes.

Costs for all Outreach Programs:
Up to 25 people - $100 plus mileage
26 – 50 people - $150 plus mileage
51 – 75 people - $200 plus mileage
76 – 100 people - $225 plus mileage
Over 100 people - $250 plus mileage

Craft supplies can be provided for an additional fee. Programs involving our farm animals are available upon request.

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All programs and prices subject to change.
 
 
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© 2014 Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm
347 Quiet Valley Road
Stroudsburg PA 18360
570-992-6161 farm@quietvalley.org
Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm is a 501(c)(3), Non-profit Educational Corporation
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